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UKIC / Confucius Institute / 2017 UKCI Distinguished Scholar Series: What does it mean to write history? Perspectives from ancient China, Greece, and Israel.

2017 UKCI Distinguished Scholar Series: What does it mean to write history? Perspectives from ancient China, Greece, and Israel.

Friday, March 10, 2017

By Julian 

 

Join the University of Kentucky Confucius Institute (UKCI) and College of Arts and Sciences in welcoming Dr. Stephen Durrant as the second speaker in the 2017 Spring Distinguished Scholars Series. His lecture entitled “What does it mean to write history? Perspectives from ancient China, Greece, and Israel.” and discussion will take place on 3:30 to 5:30, April 11that the Alumni Gallery in William T. Young Library.
 
About the Speaker: Dr. Stephen Durrant is Professor Emeritus at the University of Oregon. He is a leading scholar in the field of Manchu literature studies, as well as in the field of Chinese narrative and histroiographic tradition of the late Zhou and Han periods. Dr. Durrant's researches also explore the similarities and differences between the early Chinese narratological tradition and the roughly contemporary narrative traditions in Hebrew and Greek. His most recent book manuscripts include The Letter to Ren An and Sima Qian's Legecy (co-author) and a collaborated critical translation of the early Chinese classic Zuo Tradition. Dr. Durrant is a very well respected early China scholar both in the US and in Europe.
 
About the Lecture: The talk focuses on writing of history begins in each ancient China, Greece and Israel civilizations and investigates how those beginnings shape what follows. While there are, to be sure, similarities between these traditions of historiography, the differences are so striking as to force us to consider whether we are, in each case, speaking of precisely the same phenomenon. In his talk, Dr. Durrant will emphasize the Chinese tradition, which is too often ignored in comparative historiography, and will argue that such an approach highlights the very “curious” nature of the other two traditions, ancient Greece and early Israel.

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